Could a vaccine to prevent Alzheimer’s be on the horizon?  According to this article in Medical News Today, the potential is definitely real and it’s currently showing promise in pre-clinical trials.  If successful in the early testing, the further clinical testing will take place shortly thereafter.

“If the vaccine continues to show success in these preclinical trials, the researchers say they could be testing the vaccine in individuals at high risk for Alzheimer’s or those in the early stages of the disease within the next 3-5 years.”

Specifically, a vaccine for Alzheimer’s disease could be trialed in humans within the next 3-5 years, after researchers from the United States and Australia have uncovered a formulation that they say successfully targets brain proteins that play a role in development and progression of the disease.

Per a study by co-author Professor Nikolai Petrovsky in Australia, and colleagues reveal how a vaccine combination generates antibodies that target beta-amyloid and tau proteins in the brain – both of which are considered hallmarks of Alzheimer’s disease.  He and his colleagues reveal how a vaccine combination generates antibodies that target beta-amyloid and tau proteins in the brain – both of which are considered hallmarks of Alzheimer’s disease.

“Essentially that’s what happens in people who get Alzheimer’s or dementia is they have lots of these broken down proteins in the brain.”

Reporting in the journal Scientific Reports, the team describes how the vaccine formulation has proven safe and effective in mouse models of Alzheimer’s, and it has also successfully targeted beta-amyloid and tau proteins in human brain tissue.

Vaccine combo boosts antibody response to Alzheimer’s proteins

In their study, the researchers found that the formulation was effective and well-tolerated in Alzheimer’s mouse models, with no reports of adverse reactions.  The vaccine was also able to target the proteins in brain tissue from patients with Alzheimer’s.

“This study suggests that we can immunize patients at the early stages of AD [Alzheimer’s disease], or even healthy people at risk for AD, using our anti-amyloid-beta vaccine, and, if the disease progresses, then vaccinate with another anti-tau vaccine to increase effectiveness.”

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