Here are some great tips on how to improve your memory – and this applies to peeps of ALL ages … not just the older generation.  For both young and old alike, I find that these tips can help us all improve in this area of brain function and recollection.

As some of you have gotten older, have you noticed that you often find yourself marching around the house in a huff, searching for misplaced car keys or eyeglasses, or you just cannot remember the name of that new neighbor you met when walking the dog?  It’s frustrating, to be sure, but not inevitable — and there are things you can do to help keep your memory sharp.

“Most people get a little more forgetful with aging, but there are some simple things you can do to prevent memory slips and help your brain to learn and remember better,” says Dr. Anne Fabiny, chief of geriatrics at Cambridge Health Alliance and an assistant professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School.

? Memory-boosting tips

  1. FOLLOW ROUTINES • Be regimented and leave things such as your car keys, glasses, and cell phone in the same place every day so that finding them becomes a “no-brainer.”
  2. SLOW DOWN • Pay attention to what you are doing to give your brain’s memory systems enough time to create an enduring memory.
  3. STOP MULTITASKING • Avoid distracting or noisy environments and multitasking — the major memory busters in today’s fast-paced society.
  4. GET ENOUGH SLEEP • Try to get 7 to 8 hours per night, reduce stress, and check with your doctor to see if any of your medications affect memory — all three are potential memory spoilers.
  5. EXERCISE REGULARLY • Physical fitness and mental fitness go together. People who exercise regularly tend to stay mentally sharp into their 70s, 80s, and beyond. Although the precise “dose” of exercise isn’t known, research suggests that the exercise should be moderate to vigorous and regular. Examples of moderate exercise include brisk walking, stationary bicycling, water aerobics, and competitive table tennis. Vigorous activities include jogging, high-impact aerobic dancing, square dancing, and tennis.  Exercise helps memory in several ways. It reduces the risk of developing several potentially memory-robbing conditions like high blood pressure, diabetes, and stroke. Exercise is good for the lungs, and people who have good lung function send more oxygen to their brains. There is some evidence that exercise helps build new connections between brain cells and improves communication between them. Finally, exercise has been linked to increased production of neurotrophins, substances that nourish brain cells and help protect them against damage from stroke and other injuries.
  6. GO MEDITERRANEAN • Mediterranean-type diets highlight whole grains, fruits and vegetables, and healthy fats from fish, nuts, and healthy oils. This eating style helps promote heart health and may also lessen the risk of memory and thinking problems later in life. In a study that followed more than 2,000 people over four years, those who most closely followed a Mediterranean-type diet had a lower risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease. A later study suggested that following a Mediterranean-type diet could slow the conversion of mild cognitive impairment into full-blown dementia.
  7. EAT FRUITS & VEGGIES • Fruits and vegetables can also protect memory.  Foods from plants are chock full of vitamins, minerals, and other nutrients that may protect against age-related deterioration throughout the body.

Your daily habits and lifestyle — what you eat and drink, whether you exercise, how stressed you are, and more — affect your mental health every bit as much as your physical health.

? Reference

http://www.health.harvard.edu/